Bournemouth Skeptics in the Pub invite a guest speaker every month to come and discuss something interesting with us. The talks can be about science, reason and critical thinking, conspiracy, the paranormal, cults and so on. Listen, have a drink and ask some questions of our speaker.

We meet on the second Wednesday of each month at The Brunswick Pub, 199 Malmesbury Park Rd, Charminster, BH8 8PX (5 minutes by car or 15 minutes on foot from Bournemouth Station).

The Rise of Flat Earth Beliefs

Michael Marshall

When?
Thursday, December 13 2018 at 7:30PM

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(e.g. import to Outlook or Google Calendar)

Where?

199 Malmesbury Park Road,
Charminster
Bournemouth
BH8 8PX

Who?
Michael Marshall

What's the talk about?

Please note, this will be held on Thursday, not the normal second Wednesday.

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In 2013, when Michael Marshall first interviewed the Vice President of the Flat Earth society for his show Be Reasonable, people could scarcely believe that anyone could genuinely think the Earth was flat. Five years later, Flat Earth belief has gone mainstream, spawning thousands of hours of YouTube videos, gaining widespread international media coverage, and attracting countless followers. How did we get here?

In this talk, Marshall will talk through his experiences of the Flat Earth movement, take a look at the leaders and some of their reasoning, and report back from the weekend he spent at the UK’s first ever Flat Earth convention.

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Michael Marshall is the Project Director of the Good Thinking Society and the Vice President of the Merseyside Skeptics Society. He regularly speaks with proponents of pseudoscience for the Be Reasonable podcast. His work has seen him organising international homeopathy protests, going undercover to expose psychics and quack medics, and co-founding the popular QED conference. He has written for the Guardian, The Times and New Statesman, and recently won the Ockham Award 2018 for Skeptical Activism.

We need to get rid of the Boswellox

Emma Smith

When?
Wednesday, January 9 2019 at 7:45PM

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(e.g. import to Outlook or Google Calendar)

Where?

199 Malmesbury Park Road,
Charminster
Bournemouth
BH8 8PX

Who?
Emma Smith

What's the talk about?

Are we being inundated with “fake science” and why do people believe the hype? While at a basic level it seems harmless, what threat does the creep of fake science pose? We’ll be taking a look at some evidence of the harm that pursuing alternative therapies can cause people with a cancer diagnosis, and some of the emotional cost.

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Emma Smith studied biochemistry at Imperial College London then stayed on for a Masters and PhD on her favourite topic, immunology. After almost a decade there, she braved the move out of London and joined The Institute of Cancer Research in Sutton as a Postdoc to study multiple myeloma, a white blood cell cancer. In 2010 she left the lab behind after making the decision to work in science communications, and joined Breast Cancer Now for a short while.

In 2012 she moved to a role in the Science Communications team at Cancer Research UK and spent 6 years perfecting the art of science communications at the biggest cancer charity in the world. In 2018 she took up a position at Imperial College London working in the field of volunteer infection studies and vaccines, but most of her talk today is centered around her experiences at CRUK.

For more information:
http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org/author/emma-smith/
https://www.hic-vac.org/news
Twitter – @EmmaMarieSmith1, @hic_vac

Why is 3 so much bigger than 2?

Ben Barber

When?
Wednesday, February 13 2019 at 7:30PM

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(e.g. import to Outlook or Google Calendar)

Where?

199 Malmesbury Park Road,
Charminster
Bournemouth
BH8 8PX

Who?
Ben Barber

What's the talk about?

Maths is about patterns—spotting patterns, then working out whether they carry on forever.  Sometimes you spot patterns in the patterns—similar things happen in different settings—and then you have to ask "why?".

There are lots of places where changing a 2 to a 3 makes all the difference, turning a problem we can solve into one so complicated we may never be able to understand it.  Two player games can be played perfectly by a computer (in theory) but three player games cannot.  It's easy to tell whether exams can be scheduled across two time slots so that no students have any clashes, but very hard to tell whether three time slots are enough. 

In this presentation, Ben Barber will explain some examples of this phenomenon, then speculate wildly about what is going on.

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Ben Barber is a mathematician at the University of Bristol, where he counts the things that don't need to be counted.  He likes to tell stories, and most other things you can do on a stage.

babarber.uk

@bbarber_